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1
Advert entitled 'Missions to Seamen' in the Ipswich Journal
Advert entitled "Missions to Seamen" in the Ipswich Journal
On Tuesday next the new mission yawl, Helen, will be anchored off the Umbrella between the hours of three and eight o’clock and the missionary, Mr. Thos. Pechell, will be in attendance to take off those wishing to look over the vessel, and to give information concerning the mission. 
 
2
Advertisement asking for the return of a stolen horse
Advertisement asking for the return of a stolen horse
 
 
3
Advertisement for fire insurance, mentioning Henry Pells, Gorleston
Advertisement for fire insurance, mentioning Henry Pells, Gorleston
 
 
4
Advertisement for the sale of Owen Skinner’s Estate
Advertisement for the sale of Owen Skinner’s Estate
 
 
5
Advertisement warning poachers
Advertisement warning poachers
Placed by a group of Landowners, including Owen Skinner 
 
6
Article entitled 'Missions to Seaman' in the Ipswich Journal
Article entitled "Missions to Seaman" in the Ipswich Journal
…So without having to call upon the Parent Society, they would be enabled to supply an excellent yacht for Mr. Pechell, the Scripture reader, to do his work in… As to the work that had been carried out, he might say, as he had said before, that Mr. Pechell had proved himself the right man in the right place, and he had been indefatigable — so useful had he been that the Parent Committee had, unasked, added to his income… They were singularly fortunate in the gentleman they had obtained for their Scripture reader, for Mr. Pechell had his whole soul in the work in which he was engaged. To carry on his work amongst the sailors who came into the port was to him a labour of love. They had an institution called a Sailor’s Home, which accommodated 10 men for board and lodging. Mr. Pechell went on board all vessels that came into this port, and he made it his business always to get the crews of vessels which stayed long in this port, if possible, to use the Sailors’ Home, where they were well cared for. If the men had taken their wages — and they often took very large sums of money — he always endeavoured to persuade them to send the greater part home to their friends. In the case of one ship Mr. Pechell had been the means by which the men sent home no less a sum than £200 to their friends… With this yacht [donated by Rev. Granville Smith] Mr. Pechell went up and down the river, and boarded every vessel which came, talked with the men, distributed tracts, and, where possible, held short services. He went down to Harwich, where he would find, perhaps, as many as 300 or 400 fishing smacks lying, and he would hold short services where they lay together. He was told on all hands that Mr. Pechell was doing a vast amount of good. He would go as far as the Cork Lightship, where the men were very glad to see him…
The Mayor said he forgot to mention that Mr. R. [sic] Pechell informed him that he was much in want of a new dingy to be attached to the yacht, and if anyone would provide a dingy it would be very acceptable.
Mr. Pechell then gave an account of his work during the past year, and he expressed his gratitude for the encouragement he had received from the clergymen and inhabitants of Ipswich and Harwich. He said that much of the success which had attended his efforts was due to the encouragement he had received. He also found that he derived much advantage in his work from having been a sailor himself, by which he fount it easier to mingle with the men, and to enable them to understand each other. He explained the nature of his work, and gave instances which showed that it had been attended with success. He also stated the need he had of a new dingy. He had to do all his work in the boat, and the one he had had become old and leaky. 
 
7
Article entitled 'Missions to Seamen Society', The Ipswich Journal 20 October 1877
Article entitled "Missions to Seamen Society", The Ipswich Journal 20 October 1877
…The first missionary only came to Ipswich six months ago, and the last in August, and he had been very materially helped by the Rev. Granville Smith… The reader would have to have a kind of cutter in order that he might occasionally sleep on board, so that he might not be compelled to be home by a certain time. The reader would have a lad and a man to manage his ship…

 
 
8
Article entitled 'Missions to Seamen', Ipswich Journal, 1880.
Article entitled "Missions to Seamen", Ipswich Journal, 1880.
…He had before him the report of their Scripture reader and missionary and from it appeared that the work he had accomplished had been very great. Mr. Pechell reported that he had visited 1,782 vessels during the year, and had addressed 16,811 men: he had held 137 Scripture readings, and Admiral Mason said he had heard reports from other persons stating that these readings produced great effects amongst those to whom they were directed. Mr. Pechell further reported the sale of 64 Bibles… [I]t must be a very satisfactory thing for them to see the work which had been carried on by their missionary, which was far beyond what he had imagined… Mr. Pechell told him that his work very much increased, as the desire was becoming greater to have the benefit of his advice and counsel. 
 
9
Article on 'The Missions to Seamen Society', Ipswich Journal, 1882.
Article on "The Missions to Seamen Society", Ipswich Journal, 1882.
But none of these ladies and gentlemen would have so exerted themselves if the did not know, from actual observation, that Mr. Thomas Pechell, the agent of the Missions to Seamen, was instant in season and out of season, at the risk of health and even life, in unsparing labours for seamen. (Applause). The noble and unselfish work thus done for seamen of all nations visiting Ipswich, sets the general Committee the more free to relieve the spiritual destitution of the shipping and barges elsewhere. 
 
10
Clipping from Bury and Norwich Post: 22 January 1861
Clipping from Bury and Norwich Post: 22 January 1861
 
 
11
Clipping from Bury and Norwich Post: 3 February 1863
Clipping from Bury and Norwich Post: 3 February 1863
 
 
12
Clipping from Ipswich Journal - 1 October 1870
Clipping from Ipswich Journal - 1 October 1870
 
 
13
Clipping from Ipswich Journal - 25 November 1865
Clipping from Ipswich Journal - 25 November 1865
 
 
14
Clipping from Ipswich Journal - 30 January 1830
Clipping from Ipswich Journal - 30 January 1830
 
 
15
Clipping from Ipswich Journal - 6 January 1855
Clipping from Ipswich Journal - 6 January 1855
 
 
16
Clipping from Ipswich Journal: 31 January 1863
Clipping from Ipswich Journal: 31 January 1863
 
 
17
Clipping from London Gazette - 11 May 1830
Clipping from London Gazette - 11 May 1830
 
 
18
Clipping from London Gazette - 29 January 1830
Clipping from London Gazette - 29 January 1830
 
 
19
Clipping from London Gazette - 3 June 1831
Clipping from London Gazette - 3 June 1831
 
 
20
Clipping from London Gazette - 7 September 1830
Clipping from London Gazette - 7 September 1830
 
 
21
Clipping from London Gazette: 13 February 1855
Clipping from London Gazette: 13 February 1855
 
 
22
Clipping from London Gazette: 19 February 1830
Clipping from London Gazette: 19 February 1830
 
 
23
Clipping from London Gazette: 2 January 1855 (pg 33)
Clipping from London Gazette: 2 January 1855 (pg 33)
 
 
24
Clipping from London Gazette: 2 January 1855 (pg 34)
Clipping from London Gazette: 2 January 1855 (pg 34)
 
 
25
Clipping from London Gazette: 29 April 1862
Clipping from London Gazette: 29 April 1862
 
 
26
Clipping from the Essex Standard, 19 July 1850
Clipping from the Essex Standard, 19 July 1850
 
 
27
Clipping from The Farmer's Magazine: January, 1836
Clipping from The Farmer's Magazine: January, 1836
 
 
28
Death notice for Henry Pells in the Ipswich Journal
Death notice for Henry Pells in the Ipswich Journal
 
 
29
Death notice for John Pells in Ipswich Journal
Death notice for John Pells in Ipswich Journal
 
 
30
Local news for Witnesham, Ipswich Journal, April 23, 1881.
Local news for Witnesham, Ipswich Journal, April 23, 1881.
 
 
31
Marriage announcement between George Cocks and Sarah Pells
Marriage announcement between George Cocks and Sarah Pells
At Ipswich, Mr. George Cocks, of London, to Sarah, third daughter of the late Henry Pells, of Gorlestone. 
 
32
Marriage notice for Henry Skinner Pells and Elizabeth Frances Kerby
Marriage notice for Henry Skinner Pells and Elizabeth Frances Kerby
 
 
33
News about 'Somersham' in The Ipswich Journal (11 Feb 1882)
News about "Somersham" in The Ipswich Journal (11 Feb 1882)
…After tea the rector (Rev. Goodrich Langley) gave a short address, and introduced Mr. Pechell (Seamen’s Missionary) who exhibited his magic lantern, by which he showed first, a set of Scripture subjects, of ships and sea views, and also a set of temperance studies, contrasting the difference between the sober and the drunken home, and all these were explained by Mr. Pechell to the audience… At the close the Record thanked Mr. Pechell… 
 
34
News item entitled 'Books for Seamen', Ipswich Journal, 9 October 1877
News item entitled "Books for Seamen", Ipswich Journal, 9 October 1877
We are requested to state that the Missions to Seamen Society, 11 , Buckingham Street, Strand, London, W.C., has appointed a Scripture reader to visit the shipping on the Orwell, at Ipswich, Pin Mill, and Harwich, under the guidance of the local clergy… 
 
35
News item regarding a break-in at the house of Henry Pells
News item regarding a break-in at the house of Henry Pells
 
 
36
News item: The thief who broke into Henry Pells' house is transported
News item: The thief who broke into Henry Pells' house is transported
 
 
37
News item: the thief who broke into Henry Pells' house now in gaol
News item: the thief who broke into Henry Pells' house now in gaol
 
 
38
Notice from Hezekiah Smyth that he is to take over his father's business
Notice from Hezekiah Smyth that he is to take over his father's business
 
 
39
Notice in The Ipswich Journal
Notice in The Ipswich Journal
This (Tuesday) afternoon, from three o’clock till eight o’clock in the evening, the Orwell mission yacht, Helen, will be anchored off the Umbrella, at the end of the Dock promenade. Mr. Pechell, the missionary, will be in attendance to show the vessel to visitors, and to explain the objects of the Mission, its work, &c. 
 
40
Notice in the Norfolk Chronicle, 4 June 1831
Notice in the Norfolk Chronicle, 4 June 1831
The Creditors who have proved their Debts under a Commission of Bankrupt, awarded and issued forth against GEORGE COCKS and ISAAC HART, of Great Yarmouth, in the county of Norfolk, General Merchants, Dealers and Chapmen, are desired to meet the Assignees of the Estate and Effects of the said Bankrupts, on the twenty-ninth day of June instant, at Eleven of the clock in the Forenoon, at the Duke’s Head Inn, in Great Yarmouth aforesaid, in order to assent to or dissent from the said Assignees compounding, settling, and adjusting a certain Debt due, or claimed to be due to the said Bankrupt’s Estate, from the Honorable George John Milles, late Sheriff of the county of Norfolk. 
 
41
Notice of auction of Francis Smyth's property
Notice of auction of Francis Smyth's property
 
 
42
Notice of the auction of the property of Francis Smyth (Stowmarket)
Notice of the auction of the property of Francis Smyth (Stowmarket)
 
 
43
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1803
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1803
 
 
44
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1804
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1804
 
 
45
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1805
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1805
 
 
46
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1811
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1811
 
 
47
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1817
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1817
 
 
48
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1819
Owen Skinner, Benacre Association, 1819